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Archive for the ‘Strategic Planning’ Category

Succession Planning

Passing the Baton

When our Firm initiates a new CEO search or Succession Plan, we work with the owners and/or Board of Directors of the client company to build an “Ideal Candidate Profile.” This profile, while useful, is a target which can seem unrealistic when you start to see real live candidates. I often simplify the Profile to a short list of Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSAs) that are critical. This becomes a “must have at a minimum” list. We recently produced a list of critical “musts” for a community bank CEO search. Listed below are the five traits that we all agreed were needed by any bank CEO of the future:

  1. Ability to see local community needs and think outside the “Banker Box” to envision how the Bank can satisfy the unmet needs.
  2. Ability to inspire all constituencies with a vision that creates value for customers, staff and shareholders.
  3. Keen risk management skills to manage risk under all economic scenarios.
  4. Ability to manage a wide diversity of products and service lines.
  5. In-depth understanding of how technology is changing the marketplace.

Given enough time, some of these critical KSAs can be developed with internal succession candidates, but there must also exist within such candidates a propensity to think

broadly and deeply enough to be simultaneously analytical, creative and eloquent. Often, an outside candidate is

able to strengthen an already strong intern

al team with these KSAs.

I would be happy to present this and other succession planning topics to your owners, Board and/or your Management Team as an introduction to our Succession Strategy, Executive Development and Executive Search services. Call me at 919-732-2716 or click here and complete the request form on our website and I will reach out to you.

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Last month we discussed the alarmingly similar events and reactions that occurred in the periods of 1988-1992 and 2008-2012.  Yes, strategic planning is perhaps needed more today than at any time since the 1980’s; however, the challenges are daunting, and the road ahead has gotten hazier each day.

foggy road ahead

The road has gotten hazier

The good news is that for the banks and bankers who stick it out and survive over the next five years, the future does look bright because the very pressures bankers feel today will eventually and inevitably squeeze out lower performing banks enabling a return to rational pricing.   It is going to take some time for this to occur, but the path appears set.

A wise banker said recently, “there is a long way to go, and the journey has just begun.”  Well, just how long is that journey and just what is the future?  The regulators have given us a peak into their minds.  Here is some of their thinking:

  • The core deposit franchise will need to be nurtured and managed
  • An efficient, lean operation will be critical
  • Capital management will be essential
  • Sound strategies will be critical
  • Good financial skills and in-market knowledge will be required of Boards
  • Credit and Operational risks will be equally challenging

There are a litany of challenges and issues that will need attention for the future.  But, any way you slice it, making money in a prolonged low-interest rate environment, providing a decent return to your shareholders, dealing with over reactive regulations and returning to good old-fashioned fundamentals are the underpinnings of success in the future.

Strategic planning is not a panacea, but it is critical to survival.  As we stated before, good planning establishes objectives to achieve desired future results.  Though it cannot forecast the future, strategic planning does attempt to look at future possibilities so decision makers can rationally choose between courses of action that involve risk.  Strategic managers are proactive managers.  They tackle questions of structure and focus so they are prepared long before seismic activity is sensed.

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Change?  No change is necessary.

That is what some bankers thought when their institutions began to suffer the first shocks of a quake that started rattling the financial industry in the mid-1980s.  These bankers figured that if they just hunkered down and minded their own business the tremors would subside.

Bank Strategic Planning

Bank Failures Since 1979, Source: SNL Financial and FDIC
Number of Failed Banks in 2012 is annualized based on 23 failures as of 5/1/12

Instead, many banks – and bankers – vanished.  From 1988 to 1992, the U.S. banking industry witnessed more bank failures than ever before, especially in any comparable five year period.

The reasons were complex.  Massive change hammered the industry.  New banking laws and regulations altered how financial institutions could do business and increased base-line costs.  For banks that were already on shaky financial footing, new capital requirements dictated cutbacks and/or injections of hard-to-find investment dollars.  The debut of interstate banking intensified price-cutting campaigns to win market share, and margins began to shrink.

Sound familiar?  It’s de ja vu all over again!  “Same events, different time.”  The earthquakes returned in 2008, and the financial world began to come undone once again.

For survivors of repeated quakes, reality has arrived.  If we hope to retain our jobs and help our institutions withstand external pressures, we had better prepare for life in an earthquake zone.  Strategic Planning is needed today more than any time since the 1980’s.  Through strategic efforts, banks can intelligently re-engineer their institutions to gain the resilience and strength needed to absorb shocks – and even expand – in our unstable economy.

Strategic Planning is extremely challenging in this environment, since it requires looking at the future and making assumptions.  Today, about the only given is that more massive change lies ahead.  Yet, an outline is emerging of the future that banks will face.  Over the next four or five months, we will comment on dealing with specific trends.

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