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Posts Tagged ‘Obstacles to Planning’

At the end of last year we emphasized how strategic planning is critical for the survival of banks in the future, no matter how hazy the road to the future may be currently. Let’s drill down a little further.

Thinking strategically requires creative leadership—the ability to develop, sell and cultivate an idea from inception through implementation. Executives who want to lead their institutions as they build strategic plans must add varied skills to their management repertoire, especially skills as teachers and leaders.

Dynamic change is part of any good strategic plan

Strategic planning is a job that never ends. Because the environment and competition often prompt base assumptions to change, strategies need to be revisited at least every 12 to 18 months. Even if major tenets remain constant, strategic plans still should be reassessed periodically. Questions that bankers should ask themselves touch on internal attitudes as well as the outside world:man-with-questions-200x200

  • What have we done successfully?
  • How has the competition reacted?
  • What is different in our environment?
  • Should we continue on our current path or make changes?
  • Are any failures due to poor strategy or poor execution?

Obstacles to Success

The road from strategic planning to success may not be completely smooth. But, if executives are alert to common roadblocks, they can steer around them with as few serious detours as possible. For strategic planning to succeed, a CEO must view the process as an ongoing commitment and not an exercise to satisfy regulators. Strategic planning is a process, not a sheaf of paper.

Poor communication between an institution’s management and its board can present problems. If these two groups do not have a shared vision and are pulling in different directions, strategic planning has little chance of success. The secret is to engage both groups in the earliest planning sessions. Elitism also represents another common obstacle. In an elitist planning mode, a CEO and one or two top people may complete a strategic plan without involving any of the individuals who will actually execute it. This approach is fraught with peril. First, the planners fail to get input from people who often know far more than they do about operations, customer attitudes or competing products. Second, if middle-level managers do not play a role in developing strategy, they have little personal investment in its outcome.

A putting-out-the-fire management style can create other difficulties. In this case, the institution’s CEO and board may eagerly invest time in developing a strategy, but quickly lose interest when it comes to monitoring progress and overseeing implementation. As soon as the first crisis comes along, interest is diverted and planning is forgotten. A management team does not have to go through many planning-to-oblivion cycles before it loses complete faith in the process.

Strategic planning does not and cannot forecast the future. We have already acknowledged that while the road to the future is hazy, there is hope down the road. Planning cannot predict the exact time a quake might hit your institution, or the size and duration of the tremor. Accept the fact that you will make wrong decisions as well as right ones.

While strategic planning is not infallible, it will help you learn your institution’s strengths and weaknesses and how your resources can be marshaled to survive and thrive. Strategic planning strips change of its power to frighten and immobilize management. It offers executives the power and the skills to harness the energy of change as an engine of creativity.

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